The Unexpected Spiritual and Emotional Wisdom of… SNL?!

There’s this thing in recovery we call ‘pulling a geographic,’ which is when you decide all of your problems are actually caused by the city/town in which you live and so you move, often drastically. The problem with pulling a geographic is that actually all of your problems are caused by you and how you respond to bad things happening around you, and bad thing will always be happening around you. It’s the nature of the world!

At first this SNL sketch from last night seems like it’ll be a parody of ubiquitous package tour commercials I grew up watching on NYC local television, but then it morphs into something way wiser, which is crazy. I’m not going to do that thing people do today with SNL, which is to dissect this butterfly, but I will tell you my own experience with this exact phenomenon.

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Review: THOR RAGNAROK

This is all spoilers.

Thor: Ragnarok is one of the most unusual blockbusters in recent years because it answers a question that has been haunting the edges of Hollywood’s latest round of overinflated, unasked for franchises: how do you finish out a trilogy of films about which nobody gives a single shit?

We can sit here and argue the relative merits of Thor and Thor: The Dark World all day long, but I think that we have to agree that these films are probably the least of all the Marvel Cinematic Universe works, and that out of all the MCU movies they’re the most like the sort of forced franchise that the public can’t really get worked up about (see the currently collapsing Dark Universe for an example of the forced franchise phenomenon reaching the end of its life cycle). Out of the initial wave of MCU characters, Thor had the most intriguing and offbeat source material, and yet it somehow never quite worked onscreen. Loki popped more than Thor or any of the Asgardian side characters. The movies made some money but never captured the popular imagination in a meaningful way; in comic book terms they’re the issues in a crossover event that you buy out of a weird materialistic sense of obligation.

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