Finding Neverland: HOOK As Response To CLOSE ENCOUNTERS

Hook’s Peter Banning is a bad dad, but he’s got nothing on Close Encounters of the Third Kind’s Roy Neary. And while Roy starts off bad enough – ignoring his family at the dinner table, his home a disaster indicating a life out of control – by the end of the movie, as he happily steps on to the mothership, he’s become one of cinema’s ultimate deadbeat dads. His kids will likely never get a goodbye, and if he ever does return to Earth relativity tells us he’ll be the same age and his kids will be old.

And yet he’s the hero. His moment is triumphant, the apotheosis of his life. The little ETs are his new children-but-also-parents, and the movie treats his domestic life as something he must escape, a prison of Altmanesque clamor that has been holding him back from his true destiny. He is the one human CALLED to the stars, and aliens have traveled light years to make his acquaintance. His kids? Pains in the asses we last see taking off in a station wagon, headed who cares where. 

Close Encounters ends with Dad going to Neverland (scored to a non-Peter Pan Disney tune, When You Wish Upon A Star, but the song is close enough – Peter Pan doesn’t have a big, wistful dreamer number like that). But Hook is all about Dad coming back from Neverland, returning to be with his kids for the first time ever. Peter Banning rejects the wonder for the (upper class) every day, the kind of life Roy Neary turns from with gusto.

To me Hook is answering Close Encounters, and it’s part of a journey that Spielberg was on with his own father. While it’s vital to separate the art from the artist when it comes to how we watch – good works come from bad people! – getting intimate with the artist can open up new areas of analysis of the work, allowing us to see the entire filmmaker’s canon as a personal journey set against their own autobiography. 

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The Perfect, Shattering, Bittersweet Ending Of AI: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Years ago I interviewed Steven Spielberg and I told him that even well after the release of AI: Artificial Intelligence people on the message board of the site I wrote for, CHUD, were arguing about the ending. 

“Oh I know,” he told me. “I love reading all the arguments. And I love that they’re still arguing.”

Nineteen years after the release of AI it seems to me the arguments should be over but when I tweeted about watching the film this week I was immediately – within seconds! – hit with responses that said the movie should have ended with David trapped under water, spending all of eternity gazing upon the Blue Fairy. 

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JURASSIC PARK Is About Social Media

Jurassic Park used to feel a little retrograde to me. Not in terms of FX, which still dazzle, or story, which remains a classically tight adventure tale, but in terms of the film’s underlying themes. Jurassic Park is a throwback to an older form of movie, the kind that reached peak popularity in the 50s – cautionary tales about science gone amok.

By the time Jurassic Park came out in 1994 we had largely stopped making films like that, and if we were making films like that they were about science in the wrong hands. The nuclear threat that had driven the 50s Atomic Horror films that give us the backbone of the Science Run Amok genre was over, and the environment, which had fueled a resurgence in Nature Run Amok movies, had been relegated to PSAs and polite charitable giving. No, by 1994 we were in the early stages of the home computer revolution and we were in the post-Cold War mood of an unlimited future. History had ended, and technology was going to usher us into a great new world. The dotcom boom waited just around the corner!

Within that mindset, and within the mindset of ‘new is good, tech progress is good’ that permeated our culture for the next 20 or so years, Ian Malcolm’s admonition felt downright old fashioned.

“Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should,” he said.

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JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM Review – Same Shit, Different Dinosaur

This review contains spoilers

Jurassic World: The Fallen Kingdom is so dumb it would have voted for Trump. It’s a movie so dumb that its own premise doesn’t make a lot of sense, and it only gets worse from there. The script, by noted bad filmmakers Derek Connelly and Colin Trevorrow, pulls back from the wanton cruelty of the last film but still is entirely incapable of showing the slightest amount of heart. The Jurassic World films are simply sociopathic.

Director JA Bayona at least brings visual chops to the film, unlike Jurassic World, which was flat and boring to look at. Bayona seems to have studied Spielberg frame by frame, and many of the film’s best sequences – the end of the first act island escape, for instance – has the look of vintage Spielberg. But it doesn’t have the feel; Bayona is utterly unable to evoke the actual emotion and joy that Spielberg gets into every frame of his adventure films. Bayona’s Spielberg stuff is a simulacra, a golem of Spielberg that walks and talks but has no soul. Continue reading “JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM Review – Same Shit, Different Dinosaur”