It’s Your Fault (But It’s Not Your Fault It’s Your Fault)

Some spoilers for the Crazy Ex-Girlfriend season three finale are contained within. 

Everything you do is your fault. You did it. But the trick is to understand that it isn’t your fault that it’s your fault. That’s where it gets complicated.

Let me explain what I mean through pop culture.

Continue reading “It’s Your Fault (But It’s Not Your Fault It’s Your Fault)”

The Post-Humanist, Biocentric Films Of Darren Aronofsky

Humanism is your religion. Even if you’re an atheist, you’re probably a humanist. It’s the basis for most of our society, truly rising to prominence since the Enlightenment. It’s a secular philosophy, one that forwards rationality and critical thinking over divinity and supernatural beings. It is a philosophy that places humans at the apex of all things, and makes us responsible for our own greatness and our own destinies.

But how is that a religion? If you follow the reasoning of Yuval Noah Harari in his book Sapiens (and I do, and I think you should read this book), a religion is “a system of human norms and values that is founded on a belief in a superhuman order.”

Note the word superhuman here. This doesn’t mean supernatural, and it doesn’t mean Spider-Man. It means order that is not mandated by humans, that is above humans. Under Harari’s definition Communism is a religion, and I love his reasoning:

Continue reading “The Post-Humanist, Biocentric Films Of Darren Aronofsky”

The Ending Of THE WIZARD OF OZ Isn’t Complete Bullshit After All

The Wizard of Oz is one of my favorite movies, but I used to really hate the ending. I couldn’t get with Dorothy’s realization that there was no place like home, especially after she had been in candy-colored Oz and seen so many wonders. It felt like a cop out to me, like the movie just needed to end and it couldn’t end with this girl separated from her family forever.

Like so many other things in my life, I was wrong about the ending of The Wizard of Oz. Sure, Dorothy’s last lines are a little extreme (“And I’m not going to leave here ever, ever again, because I love you all!” Like, leave the door open for a nice vacation, or even a road trip), but it’s the insight she gets in her final moments at Oz that has become meaningful to me:

“And it’s that if I ever go looking for my heart’s desire again, l won’t look any further than my own backyard… because if it isn’t there, l never really lost it to begin with.”

Continue reading “The Ending Of THE WIZARD OF OZ Isn’t Complete Bullshit After All”

How I Blew It When Adam Yauch Died

When Adam Yauch died I totally disrespected him.

It was six years ago today that Adam Yauch ended his incarnation. Yauch was always my favorite Beastie Boy – I love his gravelly voice – and has long been an inspiration for me. Even before I hit bottom and had to find a different way to live my life, Yauch’s public change and growth served as a beacon of hope. What’s more, his public Buddhism brought me into the Free Tibet movement in the 90s, which opened the door for me to study Buddhism today.

But when he died I had not internalized the lessons he was trying to get across in his music and life. The gratitude and compassion that Yauch had found in Tibetan Buddhism was foreign to me, and I was trapped inside my own stories, anger and judgment. It led to one of the dumber episodes in the history of BIRTH.MOVIES.DEATH. (which I think was still Badass Digest at the time).
Continue reading “How I Blew It When Adam Yauch Died”

It’s Time To Stop Complaining About The Marvel Movies

Ten years. That should be long enough, right? Ten years should be long enough for everybody working in the world of film criticism (and those hopefuls filling Film Twitter with their hottest of takes) to get used to what Marvel Studios is doing with their Cinematic Universe, right? I mean, there are critics out there whose careers began well after Marvel started laying the groundwork for its universe, so it isn’t like they’re having to adjust to this stuff.

Fan Twitter got upset with Richard Brody’s dismissive New Yorker review of Infinity War (weirdly the review reads like he really liked the movie but doesn’t know how to cop to that fact). As always on Twitter people overreacted, but I think Brody’s review offers a good look at just how hollow the “these movies are ads for other movies” attitude is.

Continue reading “It’s Time To Stop Complaining About The Marvel Movies”

Is Netflix Releasing Too Many Movies?

Have you ever walked into a book store and thought, “Man, they’re printing too many books. How can all of these books compete for the attention of readers? Why, some publishers are putting out DOZENS UPON DOZENS of books a year!”

Of course you haven’t. And yet an article on The Ringer – “Netflix and Shill” – bemoans the fact that Netflix has already released 25 original movies this year, and that most of them sink without a trace. Deservedly, it seems. The argument is that Netflix, by inundating the market with these films on their service, is ruining movies and the moviegoing experience, etc etc. You should read the piece, it’s well written.

Now you’ll say, “Look, movies and books are different. You can’t compare the two.” And you’re right, more or less – they have different price points, different production methods, different economic models, different distribution methods, and they’re each consumed in different ways. (Maybe I should just end this essay right there) But it seems like the dismay about Netflix’s model is actually an echo of a continuing cycle of technophobia that goes all the way back to the transition from the oral tradition to the written word.

Continue reading “Is Netflix Releasing Too Many Movies?”

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER Rereview

We’re 18 movies into the Marvel Cinematic Universe, with another two to come this year. We’re 123 superhero films deep, according to BoxOfficeMojo (but they don’t have Abar, The First Black Superman on their list, so who knows how many other holes there are. But 123 sounds fine for the purposes of this rereview). And not one of those 18 MCU movies, and not one of those 123 superhero movies have a moment of pure, beautiful, inspiring, chest-tightening, hope-raising heroism as good as the one featured in Captain America: The First Avenger.

And get this: the moment happens before Steve Rogers even turns into Captain America.

Continue reading “CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER Rereview”

THOR Rereview

“How quaint.”

This is the thought that kept going through my head while revisiting Thor on this runup to Infinity War. Back in 2011 I hated this movie, thought it was just simply the worst of the worst and a huge, boring misstep for Marvel Studios. Today I look at it and see that it’s a movie developed in a world where comic book movies hadn’t yet entered their modern age, and the film has echoes of a landscape where David Hasselhoff played Nick Fury and where superheroes and their enemies usually had their final battle in a warehouse, or on docks, or on a bridge. Marvel knew how to make more grounded characters like Iron Man or more familiar characters like the Hulk work, but Asgardian gods? Space cities? Magic and high weirdness? They weren’t quite ready to commit just yet. Looking back from the post-Thor: Ragnarok vantage point how can we say anything but “How quaint”?

Continue reading “THOR Rereview”